Why is Apple's $999 display stuck in 2011?

Apple’s new iMac with Retina display is very pretty and useful, but in the same places where it’s made leaps and bounds, it’s also made one of Apple’s other pieces of Mac hardware look like a relic, and an increasingly obvious mistake if you were to buy it.
The Thunderbolt Display remains big, bulky, and with none of the anti-reflective or color accuracy technologies that have been in Apple’s iMac for the past two years. Once the world’s first Thunderbolt display, it’s become close to the world’s last in everything else. It’s got USB 2.0, and the first version of Thunderbolt, which was replaced by faster Thunderbolt 2 roughly a year ago — now a requirement for hooking up to 4K displays.
There’s still no denying that the Thunderbolt Display was, and still is an exciting idea, something that is close to the vision of replacing a rat’s nest of cables with just a plug or two. While the idea of what we do on desktop computers versus tablets and our phones is still being formed, it’s very easy to look at this now languishing product as a taste of things to come.

Sad Bill Murray singing Bob Dylan is the best Bill Murray

Building OS X Apps with JavaScript

OS X Yosemite introduced JavaScript for Automation. This makes it possible to access native OS X frameworks with JavaScript. I’ve been digging in to this new world and putting together examples along the way. In this post I’ll explain the basics and step through building a small example app.

In the beginning, there was design

Before any other human discipline, even before the dawn of mankind its self, design was a practice passed down from generation to generation of early humans. Today, everything that has been designed — space ships, buildings, pyramids, weapons, clothing, artwork, everything can be traced back to a single designed object.

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photo by Mari Sheibley

Here are some talented photographers on Tumblr. Personal recommendation.

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Trey Ratcliff — treyratcliffphotos.tumblr.com
Chris Ozer — chrisozer.tumblr.com
Trashhand — blog.trashhand.com
Rog Walker — insights.rogwalker.com
Mari Sheibley — marisheibley.com
Tonoariki — tonoariki.tumblr.com
Erin Hoffstetter — diary.erinhoffstetter.com
Tim Boelaars — timboelaars.tumblr.com
Aaron Feaver — blog.aaronfeaver.com (NSFW)
Justin Chung — blog.justinchungphotography.com
Ramsay de Give and Kristen Joy Watts — weightofobjects.com
Iakiv Pekarskyi — happytraveller.tumblr.com
Megan Kathleen McIsaac — meganmcisaac.tumblr.com (NSFW)
Yoann Stoeckel — yoannstoeckel.tumblr.com
Daniel Shea — danielshea.tumblr.com
Arto Saari — artosaari.tumblr.com
Collin Hughes — collinhughes.tumblr.com
Helena Price — blog.helenaprice.com
Sébastian Dahl — blog.sebastiandahl.com
Tony Katai — blog.tonykatai.com (NSFW)
Alex Matzke — alexmatzke.tumblr.com
Scott Pommier — scottpommier.tumblr.com
David Tribby — davidtribby.com
Peter Baker — ptrbkr.com
Liz Devine — lizdevine.tumblr.com
Noah Sheldon — fareastbroadway.com
Michael O’neal — michaeloneal.tumblr.com
Griffin Lamb — griffinlambco.tumblr.com
James Chororos — blog.jameschororos.com
Lauren Lemon — laurenlemon.tumblr.com

If you want to be listed drop me a line.
photo by Mari Sheibley

Here are some talented photographers on Tumblr. Personal recommendation.

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Sip for OS X

Sip is a simple yet powerful tool for colour picking. I’m using it everyday for my workflow in Sketch and Photoshop. This simple and easy to use tool silently sits upon menu extras ready to pick, collect and identify colours.



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I am an avid amateur photographer (veering into freelance work) who also works on a Mac. I have enjoyed using Aperture since day 1. I also have used Lightroom and while it’s excellent, I still prefer Aperture’s interface and “feel”.
I understand all the reasons for ceasing development but to me this is still pretty sad. I have been holding out hopes that with the new Mac Pro, Apple will renew development effort in Aperture (remember Final Cut Pro X / Logic Pro X?).
For those who say one should move on, you are not wrong but it would be nice if you could understand that it’s pretty hard to take when someone asks you to throw out the tool you have grown to love and master over the years.

I am an avid amateur photographer (veering into freelance work) who also works on a Mac. I have enjoyed using Aperture since day 1. I also have used Lightroom and while it’s excellent, I still prefer Aperture’s interface and “feel”.
I understand all the reasons for ceasing development but to me this is still pretty sad. I have been holding out hopes that with the new Mac Pro, Apple will renew development effort in Aperture (remember Final Cut Pro X / Logic Pro X?).
For those who say one should move on, you are not wrong but it would be nice if you could understand that it’s pretty hard to take when someone asks you to throw out the tool you have grown to love and master over the years.

A year ago Adobe has adopted digital subscription distribution model and released Creative Cloud. I immediately installed it and moved all my data and workflow to Photoshop CC. Today Adobe released another major version of Creative Cloud software as well as Photoshop CC 2014, and it’s huge. Check it out on Photoshop.com blog.


  Today we’re also releasing a completely new version of Photoshop CC with important new features for designers and photographers: from improved Layer Comps to enable you to sync changes across multiple comps, to new Blur Gallery motion effects like Spin Blur and Path Blur, to Focus Mask which automatically selects the area of an image that is in-focus, to improved type and font capabilities, and even more 3D printing enhancements. This release is packed with new capabilities that enable you to push your creativity farther, faster.









Good news for photographers and retouchers — from today You can get Photoshop and Lightroom (desktop and mobile) only for $10 per month. See details on creative.adobe.com/plans/photography.


Until this day I personally do not recommended to upgrade to CC apps from CS5.5 or newer. But things have changed, get a CC 2014 trial and You will see its fast and powerful performance. As for me, new fonts catalog it awesome and enhanced content aware fill is a life-saver:
New feature — Focus Mask which automatically selects the area of an image that is in-focus:
And tons of bug fixes, for example the tedious one with white palette windows, that appears after using Lasso with Wacom Intuos tablet.Hint: Photoshop CC 2014 and other “2014” apps will be installed in a separate folder on your hard drive, so You need to start CC 2014 before deleting old one in order to move your settings and resources. 3rd party plugins may be copied manually. Also I used to setup my Wacom prefs for PS 2014 as a new app.

A year ago Adobe has adopted digital subscription distribution model and released Creative Cloud. I immediately installed it and moved all my data and workflow to Photoshop CC. Today Adobe released another major version of Creative Cloud software as well as Photoshop CC 2014, and it’s huge. Check it out on Photoshop.com blog.

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If you learn and follow these five typography rules, you will be a better typographer than 95% of professional writers and 70% of professional designers. (The rest of this book will raise you to the 99th percentile in both categories.)
All it takes is ten minutes — five minutes to read these rules once, then five minutes to read them again.

If you learn and follow these five typography rules, you will be a better typographer than 95% of professional writers and 70% of professional designers. (The rest of this book will raise you to the 99th percentile in both categories.) All it takes is ten minutes — five minutes to read these rules once, then five minutes to read them again.

PROOF | Photography that bears witness

PROOF is National Geographic’s new online photography experience. It was launched to engage ongoing conversations about photography, art, and journalism. In addition to featuring selections from the magazine and other publications, books, and galleries, this site will offer new avenues for our audience to get a behind-the-scenes look at the National Geographic storytelling process. We view this as a work in progress and welcome feedback as the site evolves. We can be reached at proof@ngs.org.